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BEING RICH, FAMOUS AND HAPPY DOESN'T MEAN YOU CAN'T BE DEPRESSED

BEING RICH, FAMOUS AND HAPPY DOESN'T MEAN YOU CAN'T BE DEPRESSED

 Kate Spade 

Kate Spade 

BEING RICH, FAMOUS AND HAPPY DOESN'T MEAN YOU CAN'T BE DEPRESSED

I’ve seen so many news headlines this week commenting on the tragic death of fashion icon Kate Spade with a similar message ‘despite all her wealth, fame, and success -  she was still depressed’. As though having money and having a mental illness can’t go hand in hand. To me, the news that Kate Spade suffered from depression that ended her life is on par to the idea that Kate Spade battled cancer, or any other disease of the body. 

Anyone with money can get sick, and depression is a sickness. Fortune and fame can’t ward it off, just like a supportive partner or successful children are no cures for it either. The whole point really, is that depression unlike general sadness, isn’t always caused by rational problems. Just like any other sickness the explanation lies within our genetics and our environment. It’s as toxic to our hormonal and physical systems as any other debilitating disease.

There’s a core assumption in this week’s news that money buys happiness, and let’s go along with that for a moment, there’s also a second statement being made here that I find even more aggravating - that happiness and depression can’t co-exist. The happiness that wealth affords, and even the comfort that a supportive family and friend network can give you is not always enough to combat the all encompassing aspects of depression. PsychologyToday explains that people with depression can still experience times of happiness, but when the dark days come people who are depressed can’t always pull themselves out of that bleakness. I hope that part of Kate Spade’s legacy is that her passing encourages others who feel guilty about their depression because they “have nothing to be sad about” can find the strength to get the support they need.

The United States’ official mental health website www.mentalhealth.gov lists the causes of mental health problems as follows:

●     Biological factors, such as genes, physical illness, injury, or brain chemistry

●     Life experiences, such as trauma or a history of abuse

●     Family history of mental health problems

So even if Kate Spade lived a blissful life free of any matter that money could solve, it’s really no surprise that she, along with 1 in 5 Americans, experienced a mental health issue. 

In my work on a book I’m writing about pregnancy I have been researching post partum depression. After interviewing many women who have suffered from this life experience I was surprised to hear similar themes come up again and again. Guilt. Guilt that their husband was totally supportive but they couldn’t appreciate it, guilt that their newborn was a wonderful sleeper and happy baby but they still felt unable to emotionally attach. While the hardships of financial strains are significant aggravations on mental health, a woman who is spared of them isn’t necessarily spared of mental health issues. 

WRITTEN BY MARION

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Marion is a content creator who started one of the first Mommy YouTube channels about being a Jewish mom. On her MyJewishMommyLifechannel and @MyJewishMommyLife Instagram page she shares her experiences as a mother to her baby boy, focused on living a meaning-FULL Jewish family life.


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Women talking unashamedly about their mental health and parenting innit.

EVERYTHING IS AMPLIFIED IN MOTHERHOOD

EVERYTHING IS AMPLIFIED IN MOTHERHOOD

ENDLESS CRAPPY DAYS

ENDLESS CRAPPY DAYS